Executive Health Administration

4 Areas Healthcare Leaders Can Reduce Spending

[fa icon="calendar'] Jun 15, 2017 1:52:03 PM / by EMHA Blog posted in Health Economics, Skills

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Shifting from a volume-based business model to a value-based model can require exhaustive research, meticulous planning, steadfast implementation and careful monitoring going forward. But the rewards can be a transformation that allows an organization to survive and thrive in the ever-changing world of health care.

According to a report by McKesson, based upon the pharmaceutical corporation’s survey of payers and providers and an Accountable Care Organization (ACO) readiness study, executives at top performing ACOs – where doctors, hospitals, and other health care providers team to give coordinated care to Medicare patients – strategies in four areas in particular are allowing them to reduce spending and deliver services more effectively.

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USC Policy Experts Address the Future of Healthcare

[fa icon="calendar'] May 2, 2017 5:31:00 PM / by EMHA Blog posted in Health Policy, Health Economics, Population Health

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As the debate over the future of healthcare in the U.S. continues to unfold in legislative corridors, the national media and street corner coffee shops across America, the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy hosted a timely and informative discussion featuring four faculty members of the USC Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics: Dana Goldman, Neeraj Sood, Julie Zissimopoulos and Erin Trish.

The panelists said the complex issue, including the potential repeal or reform of the Affordable Care Act, will require difficult conversations involving economic and social concerns, and perhaps a fundamental change in defining health care.

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Viable approaches to a federal replacement plan - California provides model

[fa icon="calendar'] Feb 17, 2017 3:07:24 PM / by EMHA Blog posted in Transformation, Health Policy, Health Economics, USC Schaeffer Center, Affordable Care Act, Federal Replacement Plan

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We are pleased to share with you an op-ed that ran this week in the Sacramento Bee, written by our Board of Councilors member Leonard Schaeffer - founding chairman and former CEO of WellPoint, (a.k.a. Anthem) and Dana Goldman - director of the Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics, a joint Center of the USC Price School of Public Policy and the USC School of Pharmacy.

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Schaeffer Initiative Develops Evidence-Based Healthcare Policy

[fa icon="calendar'] Feb 5, 2016 7:30:00 AM / by USC posted in Health Economics, Affordable Care Act, Medicare, Innovation

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The joint initiative will examine the nation’s most pressing health care issues such as the cost of Medicare and the shaping of the Affordable Care Act

Leonard D. Schaeffer, a trustee of both Brookings and the University of Southern California, has provided a gift of $4 million to establish the Leonard D. Schaeffer Initiative for Innovation in Health Policy, a partnership between the Center for Health Policy at Brookings and the Leonard D. Schaeffer Center for Health Policy & Economics at USC

USC Professor Paul Ginsburg will direct the joint work of the new Schaeffer Initiative which aims to tackle some of the nation’s most pressing health care problems, including the future of Medicare as costs continue to rise, shaping the Affordable Care Act to improve outcomes, and maximizing the value of innovation in drugs and devices.

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4 Evidence Based Strategies for Improving Medicare

[fa icon="calendar'] Aug 13, 2015 6:00:00 PM / by Alice Liu posted in Health Policy, Health Economics

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Medicare has undoubtedly helped millions of seniors and disabled adults receive health coverage since being signed into law in 1965.  Today, Medicare covers 55 million beneficiaries across the US. In the coming decades though, Medicare faces a complex multitude of competing environmental pressures.   First, the sheer size of the Medicare-eligible population is projected to increase significantly: according to the US census, by 2029 all the baby boomers will be 65 or older which will account for 20 percent of the US population.  Adding to that increased pressure is the trends showing this population will be living with more disabilities and living longer than previous generations.

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Obamacare Subsidies: Intergenerational Equity and Economic Impact

[fa icon="calendar'] Mar 26, 2015 8:56:00 AM / by William D. Leach, Ph.D. posted in Health Economics, Affordable Care Act

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When insurance companies began pricing their Affordable Care Act policies in 2013, younger Americans were left holding the short end of the stick. True, young adults ages 18-to-25 were the first demographic to benefit from the 2011 phase-in of the health care law, which allowed adult children to remain on a parent’s policy. Some 2 to 3 million young adults joined the ranks of the insured under that provision. But policies for older Millennials and those without an insured parent were often priced comparably or higher than before Obamacare, even after factoring in federal subsidies. As Forbes columnist Scott Gottlieb put it, “Obamacare is asking young adults to effectively subsidize the healthcare costs of older Americans.” Looking at premium prices alone, young Americans seemed to have gained relatively little from the new insurance exchanges.

To gain broader perspective on the generational equity of Obamacare, it is helpful to place Marketplace subsidies in the context of the nation’s entire social safety net. In a previous post, I detailed how ACA subsidies compare to other entitlement programs in terms of average monthly benefit and total cost to taxpayers. To recap, the average Marketplace subsidy of $268 per month is a modest benefit relative to other programs, such as unemployment insurance, Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid, which spend $800 to $1,500 per beneficiary per month, on average. Moreover, with a total annual cost of $30 billion, Obamacare subsidies are adding less than 2% to the total cost of America’s social welfare system.

Generational issues come into focus by ranking the various social programs according to age of beneficiary, as in the first two graphics below.

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Four Ways Behavioral Economics Can Drive Smarter Decisions in Health Care

[fa icon="calendar'] Mar 2, 2015 6:56:00 AM / by William D. Leach, Ph.D. posted in Pay-for-Performance, Health Policy, Health Economics, USC Schaeffer Center, Psychological Sciences, Accountable Care Organizations, Behavioral Economics

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In the 200-year history of the social sciences, no assumption about human nature has been more influential than the idea that people are basically rational and self-interested.  Rational self-interest is a defining premise in economics, and it has propagated throughout the social sciences to fields such as public administration and human resource management. If you want employees to work harder, the prescription is clear: pay them more when they perform well, and monitor their performance to detect and punish shirking.
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