Executive Health Administration

Leadership Skills for Highly Effective Hospital Boards

[fa icon="calendar'] May 8, 2017 11:31:08 AM / by EMHA Blog posted in Innovative Leadership, Health Policy, Health Care Careers

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In many respects, the qualities found in a highly functional hospital governing board or a consummate healthcare board member are no different from those in other non-profit orcorporate environments.

The leadership skills, collaborative mindset, decision-making ability, passionate drive and knack for building relationships that are so fundamental to success are universal.

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USC Policy Experts Address the Future of Healthcare

[fa icon="calendar'] May 2, 2017 5:31:00 PM / by EMHA Blog posted in Health Policy, Health Economics, Population Health

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As the debate over the future of healthcare in the U.S. continues to unfold in legislative corridors, the national media and street corner coffee shops across America, the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy hosted a timely and informative discussion featuring four faculty members of the USC Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics: Dana Goldman, Neeraj Sood, Julie Zissimopoulos and Erin Trish.

The panelists said the complex issue, including the potential repeal or reform of the Affordable Care Act, will require difficult conversations involving economic and social concerns, and perhaps a fundamental change in defining health care.

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Viable approaches to a federal replacement plan - California provides model

[fa icon="calendar'] Feb 17, 2017 3:07:24 PM / by EMHA Blog posted in Transformation, Health Policy, Health Economics, USC Schaeffer Center, Affordable Care Act, Federal Replacement Plan

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We are pleased to share with you an op-ed that ran this week in the Sacramento Bee, written by our Board of Councilors member Leonard Schaeffer - founding chairman and former CEO of WellPoint, (a.k.a. Anthem) and Dana Goldman - director of the Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics, a joint Center of the USC Price School of Public Policy and the USC School of Pharmacy.

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Air Pollution Worsens Diseases and Cognitive Function

[fa icon="calendar'] Dec 21, 2016 9:15:00 AM / by Emily Gersema posted in Health Policy, Population Health

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Air pollution and neighborhood stress appear to harm the aging brain. A combination of stressors could mean more cognitive impairment for vulnerable older adults, USC researcher says.

A USC study will examine the relationship between social stressors and environmental pollution on cognition in older adults. (Photo/Shutterstock)

Even with key steps taken to decrease air pollution in recent decades, there are serious health effects connected to auto exhaust and other pollutants in the air we breathe, especially for older adults. Air pollution can worsen existing heart disease, lung disease, diabetes and more in older people, according to Jennifer Ailshire, assistant professor at the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology. Her latest research, published online Nov. 14 in the journal Social Science and Medicine, indicates that living in a high-pollution environment can also contribute to an increased risk of cognitive problems.

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Invest in Your Healthcare Administration Skills

[fa icon="calendar'] Aug 5, 2016 7:30:00 AM / by Anna Montgomery, MPA posted in Health Policy, Healthcare Careers

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In the 50th anniversary edition, Kiplinger’s ran an article that outlined the keys to financial security. At the top of the list was investing in yourself. You are your greatest asset for creating wealth. Investments in your education, career skills, and professional development provide the best returns for achieving financial goals. When I decided to invest in my career by pursuing a master’s degree I needed to assess if the degree was a good fit for my career goals. As a mid-career professional with years of leadership experience it was helpful for me to consider what skills and experience I had and identify any gaps that could be filled through education. I knew that a good fit meant finding a program where I could build on my strengths while stretching to learn new skills and information. While the decision to pursue a graduate degree is complex, including financial, professional, and personal factors, a skills assessment is a good place to start.

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Gains in Longevity Versus Quality of Life

[fa icon="calendar'] Apr 22, 2016 9:00:05 AM / by Anna Montgomery, MPA posted in Health Policy, Population Health

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The demographics of the US are shifting. Columbia University’s Health and Aging Policy Fellows state: “In many ways, gerontology represents the future of health care . . . By 2030, 71 million Americans will be 65 and older. These individuals are at high risk for complex health problems, chronic illness, and disability, and they are, and will continue to be, the heaviest users of health care. Although estimates vary, today, older adults account for a substantial proportion of hospital days, ambulatory adult primary care visits, home care visits, and nursing home residents. Over the next 30 years, as the number of older Americans doubles, almost every medical specialty will have an increasingly older patient base. As a result, society is facing critical challenges regarding health and social services.” Aging populations raise specific concerns about the prevalence of disability, quality of life, public policy, and impact on healthcare.

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DC Health Policy Forum Focuses on Shaping Nation’s Health Care System

[fa icon="calendar'] Mar 22, 2016 9:00:00 AM / by Cheryl Arvidson posted in Health Policy

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Price faculty, students and alumni convene at the inaugural Washington, D.C., Health Policy Forum. (Photo by Dave Scavone) 

 

The inaugural Washington, D.C., Health Policy Forum brought together leading experts from the federal government, industry and academia — giving students and alumni from the USC Price School of Public Policy the opportunity to delve deeply into the intricacies of making changes to the nation’s health care system.

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The Realities of Health Disparities

[fa icon="calendar'] Feb 26, 2016 12:32:12 PM / by Anna Montgomery, MPA posted in Health Policy, Population Health, Clinical Research

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“Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane” Martin Luther King Jr., 1966.

While five decades have passed since Dr. King highlighted the need to address health disparities, many differences in outcomes have continued to grow. Dana Goldman, director of the Leonard D. Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics at the University of Southern California has studied disparities. In a recent New York Times article he provided his expertise on the issue: 

Many researchers believe the gap in life spans from lower- to upper-income Americans started widening about 40 years ago, when income inequality began to grow. The broad adoption of medication for high blood pressure in the 1950s led to a major improvement for black men, erasing a big part of the gap with whites. . . Earlier in the 20th century, trends in life spans were of declining disparities, some experts say, because improvements in public health, such as the invention of the polio vaccine and improved sanitation, benefited rich and poor alike.

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Malpractice Risk Impedes Healthcare Reform

[fa icon="calendar'] Nov 6, 2015 7:30:00 AM / by Emily Gersema posted in Health Policy

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Study finds physicians do more for patients believing it reduces liability risk 

Physicians who spend more money and resources conducting tests and procedures for patients are less likely to be sued for malpractice, according to a new study that indicates “defensive medicine” may work. Published Nov. 4 by The BMJ, the study by researchers at USC, Harvard University and Stanford University noted that doctors in surveys worldwide said they practice defensive medicine — doing more for patients because they believe it reduces liability risk. The study affirms this widely held assumption, tying higher spending to lower malpractice claim rates through an analysis of Florida physician and claims data.

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Weighing Cost/Value in Prescription Drug Pricing and Policy

[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 29, 2015 12:00:00 PM / by Stephanie Hedt posted in Health Policy

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When Turing Pharmaceuticals raised the price of a drug that had been on the market for over 60 years from $13 to $750 a pill there was overwhelming public dismay.  For many, it highlighted the growing concern over prescription drug prices.  

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