Executive Health Administration

Cultural Context Imperative for Global Health Solutions

[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 22, 2015 7:30:00 AM / by Susan Bell posted in Health Policy, Population Health

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments

                                                                                                                                                                   (Illustration by Richard Mia)

After a catastrophic 7.0 magnitude earthquake ripped through Haiti in 2010, crews posted signs warning against drinking contaminated river water. But since most of the population could not read, the caution went largely unheeded. The well-intended crews lacked cultural understanding — a mistake that resulted in a devastating outbreak of cholera.

Read More [fa icon=long-arrow-right"]

Hospital Productivity Shows Gains Based on Key Outcome Measures

[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 4, 2015 7:30:00 AM / by Stephanie Hedt posted in Health Policy, Hospital Administration

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments


Issues

In a new Health Affairs article released in February, Schaeffer Center researchers provide evidence that hospital productivity increased from 2002 to 2011, suggesting that the US health care system could be performing better than many believe.  John Romley, Research Assistant Professor at the USC Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics and lead author on the study observes, “The Affordable Care Act asks hospitals and other health care providers to achieve the level of productivity gains seen in the rest of the economy.  In recent years, U.S. hospitals have actually managed to make that kind of improvement in treating a number of important conditions.”

Read More [fa icon=long-arrow-right"]

Public Health: Costs of Low Adult Immunization Rates

[fa icon="calendar'] Aug 25, 2015 7:30:00 AM / by Justin McGinnis posted in Health Policy

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments

With National Immunization Awareness Month upon us, and the fall respiratory season just around the corner, vaccines are sure to make their way into headlines.  It’s easy to get distracted by the controversy and politicizing that all-too-often occupies this debate, but regardless of ones stance on the issue, the high costs associated with the diseases they prevent are indisputable. 

In a recent study my colleagues and I found the annual economic burden of four vaccine-preventable diseases (influenza, pneumococcal, herpes zoster(shingles), pertussis(whooping cough)) to be an estimated $26.5 billion among adults aged 50 years and older in the United States.

Read More [fa icon=long-arrow-right"]

4 Evidence Based Strategies for Improving Medicare

[fa icon="calendar'] Aug 13, 2015 6:00:00 PM / by Alice Liu posted in Health Policy, Health Economics

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments


Medicare has undoubtedly helped millions of seniors and disabled adults receive health coverage since being signed into law in 1965.  Today, Medicare covers 55 million beneficiaries across the US. In the coming decades though, Medicare faces a complex multitude of competing environmental pressures.   First, the sheer size of the Medicare-eligible population is projected to increase significantly: according to the US census, by 2029 all the baby boomers will be 65 or older which will account for 20 percent of the US population.  Adding to that increased pressure is the trends showing this population will be living with more disabilities and living longer than previous generations.

Read More [fa icon=long-arrow-right"]

Ethics and Necessity of Healthcare Interoperability

[fa icon="calendar'] Aug 7, 2015 7:30:00 AM / by Anna Montgomery, MPA posted in Health Policy, Information Technology

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments

The necessity and benefits of healthcare interoperability are increasingly apparent, though implementation is elusive. Clinical effectiveness, efficiency, and patient safety are at stake.

"We have an ethical obligation to develop and implement plug-and-play clinical devices and information technology systems. Potential improvements from doing so include avoiding or reducing adverse events, transcription errors and redundant testing. Clinicians will benefit from reduced alarm fatigue and time spent manually entering information. Our patients will benefit from decreased length of hospital stays through our ability to improve the speed of information transfers and lower costs related to integrating and maintaining technologies." - William Stead, MD, Chairman of the Technical Advisory Committee, Center for Medical Interoperability

Read More [fa icon=long-arrow-right"]

USC Health Policy Pioneer Celebrates 50th Anniversary of Medicare

[fa icon="calendar'] Aug 1, 2015 7:30:00 AM / by Anna Montgomery, MPA posted in Health Policy

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments

What you probably know from watching the news this week is that Medicare, signed into law by President Johnson in 1965, reached it's 50th anniversary. What you probably didn't know is that USC's Dr. Peter Lee played a part in creating and implementing the legislation. 

Read More [fa icon=long-arrow-right"]

8 Communication Strategies to Combat Harmful Health Misconceptions

[fa icon="calendar'] Apr 14, 2015 8:33:00 AM / by William D. Leach, Ph.D. posted in Health Policy, Psychological Sciences, Behavioral Economics, Health Misconceptions

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments

One of the most popular tools in public health is the “myth-versus-fact” brochure. Government agencies and nonprofits, from CDC to American Red Cross, frequently use this tool to combat misinformation on all manner of health topics including vaccination, fluoridated water, first-aid remedies, and suicide prevention. Myth-versus-fact is also a popular narrative device among journalists who value it for its seemingly balanced airing of both sides of a controversy, and for its ability to hook the reader through dramatic, head-to-head conflict. Engaging our rational and emotional faculties alike, the myth-versus-fact format has obvious appeal... Obvious, and apparently all wrong.

Read More [fa icon=long-arrow-right"]

Four Ways Behavioral Economics Can Drive Smarter Decisions in Health Care

[fa icon="calendar'] Mar 2, 2015 6:56:00 AM / by William D. Leach, Ph.D. posted in Pay-for-Performance, Health Policy, Health Economics, USC Schaeffer Center, Psychological Sciences, Accountable Care Organizations, Behavioral Economics

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments

In the 200-year history of the social sciences, no assumption about human nature has been more influential than the idea that people are basically rational and self-interested.  Rational self-interest is a defining premise in economics, and it has propagated throughout the social sciences to fields such as public administration and human resource management. If you want employees to work harder, the prescription is clear: pay them more when they perform well, and monitor their performance to detect and punish shirking.
Read More [fa icon=long-arrow-right"]

Subscribe to Email Updates

See if an Executive Masters of Health Administration is for you